16 August 2007

Secondary Smoke Linked to Childhood Asthma

Childhood asthma (as well as other pulmonary problems) has been on the rise for decades. The cause, however, has remained something of a mystery.

Recently published research in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology puts forth damning evidence for cigarette smoking. Researchers analyzed data on cigarette use and asthma incidence over the past 100 years and noted parallel increases in both. Their conclusion:

We present one possible factor that may be contributing to the epidemic of childhood asthma. We hypothesize that (1) there has been a marked increase in smoking during the past century, (2) this increase in smoking has resulted in a substantial increase in exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among children, and (3) increased exposure to environmental tobacco smoke has contributed to the increase in childhood asthma.

A report in the August Infectious Diseases in Children adds:

Children breathe more air than adults and have narrower airways, so environmental tobacco smoke is a greater causal risk factor for asthma in children.

Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially in the home, increased a child's likelihood of developing asthma by 63%...


Smoking. It pollutes, it litters, it stinks, and it contributes to asthma in children. But it's a synonym for freedom, according to at least one person (and read those comments to see who hates our smokings).

5 comments:

Jackie Danicki said...

I've never been a smoker. I do not allow people to smoke in my home. (My domain? My rules. Same should go for business owners.)

I always had the choice of whether to patronize and hang out in places where people smoked. Always.

What planet did you live on where this choice was not offered to you? It must have been a horrible place.

WestEnder said...

Judging from this comment and others you've made, you obviously have no idea what gave impetus to Issue 5 and no desire to learn.

And to answer your question, I lived on the planet where global warming exists, which, based on previous comments you've made, does indeed seem different from the one you inhabit.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Jackie Danicki said...

You've mistaken me for a climate change denier. I'm happy to correct you on that.

With THAT totally irrelevant bit out of the way...

Please answer my question. Where did you live where you were not ALWAYS offered the choice of whether or not to hang out in places where people smoke? Where did you live where it was not your choice whether or not to spend money in places (restaurants, bars, private clubs) where people smoke?

WestEnder said...

Interesting that you attempt to accuse me of stating something irrelevant when your comment had absolutely nothing to do with my post. With THAT out of the way...

Look, when I said you have no idea what Issue 5 was about and no desire to learn, what I meant was that you have no idea what Issue 5 was about and no desire to learn. Your comment only reinforces that.

If you want to believe it was about freedom and choices and act like an Ann Coulter "mini me" who thinks she gets it and everyone else is stupid, I guess that's your choice and you're free to do it.

Do you think industries should be able to dump chemical waste into rivers? Their business, their rules, right?

Should I be allowed to remove the catalytic converter from my car? My car, my rules, right?

Should I be allowed to burn piles of garbage on my property? My property, my rules, right?

Should nuclear plants be allowed to bury waste on their land? Their land, their rules, right?

It's not about suppressing freedoms, it's about safeguarding public health.

Please calm down, smoke a fatty, open up a cold one, and make SOME effort to understand instead of frothing at the mouth.

Mark said...

I lived where I was not ALWAYS offered the choice of whether or not to hang out in places where people set off explosives, ran about naked, and/or smoked certain substances? Here in the U.S. I lived where it was not my choice whether or not to spend money in places (restaurants, bars, private clubs) where people set off explosives, ran about naked, and/or smoked certain substances?

By not having those choices am I forever ruined? Is not having an additional choice about cancer-causing substances so unexpected?